DIP

Have you ever wanted feedback on unfinished work but felt weird  publishing unpolished content? DIP is a simple way to get around this, as it empowers students to curate the conversation around their work for optimal feedback on in-progress projects. 

My responsibilities for this project included survey design, synthesizing user research, and user experience strategy.  

Client: Personal Project

Role: User Research

Team: Seyi Amole

Duration: 4 Weeks

BACKGROUND

PROBLEM SPACE

Receiving feedback early in a project can be helpful in forming the right ideas. However, we noticed that students here at Georgia Tech rarely post their work on design-sharing sites for feedback on their projects.

 

To understand why this was the case, we delved deeper by asking our peers to get a better understanding of the problem.

We found that students don't feel comfortable seeking feedback on existing platforms, because 95% of the work of on these sites are polished and completed

 

For those looking for critique on on-going work, it can feel out-of-place to post unrefined, incomplete projects with the intent of soliciting feedback. There is a clear mis-match in user goals.

GOALS

+ Facilitate conversations between peers 

+ Foster an open design culture where students can share their work       to get valuable feedback

Develop a platform specifically for in-progress work

STUDENT SURVEY

KEY FINDINGS

To find out why students weren't sharing their work-in-progress, we created and shared a survey across the design school. Our intent was to further understand student's motivations for sharing their work to develop a platform ideal for giving and receiving critique. 

How can we get motivate students to share their ongoing projects?

+ Sharing unfinished work isn't intimidating for all students--there   simply aren't any appropriate platforms for in-progress projects

+ Sharing unfinished work can be uncomfortable and prone to   misinterpretation

+ Students want feedback from people they consider to be experts, particularly those that align with their skill sets 

SURVEY RESULTS

USER PERSONAS

OLIVIA

Level of Comfort Sharing 2

Perceived Usefulness of Feedback 4

Design Platforms Behance

Design Platform Use Monthly

+ Feels intimidated about sharing her work

+ Only goes to people she trusts for feedback

+ Is not receptive to feedback once she posts finished and polished work

+ Has accounts to follow people for inspiration

+ Only posts when the professor requires it 

KING

Level of Comfort Sharing 5

Perceived Usefulness of Feedback 2

Design Platforms Behance, Dribbble, Instagram

Design Platform Use Weekly

+ King feels like when he asks for feedback, peers give him feedback based on personal preference 

+ He values objective and expert feedback

+ Posts frequently on Behance and Dribbble

+ Regularly updates his portfolio site

CONTENT STRATEGY

For the content of the product, we employed a feed-like interface that allows users to easily share and view projects.

 

For more information on the interface design, check out Seyi's portfolio!

HOME

UPLOAD

SHARE

FINAL DESIGN

CONTEXTUAL FEED

Easily navigate to categories of content to customize viewing experience.

FEEDBACK WITH PROPER CONTEXT

To ensure that you receive informed feedback we have designed DIP in such a way that users get context of the project first, before commenting. 

EFFORTLESSLY

SHARE

We have designed DIP to allow you share projects without seamlessly, simply upload projects right from your camera roll.

We hope to keep iterating through this concept, developing more in depth methods by which students communicate ideas with peers and receive feedback. We hope to further explore the definition of what "good feedback" truly looks like and how we can enable students to feel more comfortable with the idea of sharing unfinished projects.